In the Finale, the Winner Proved Fusion Cooking Isn’t Just Some Lame ’80s Fad

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This season we’re recapping every episode of Top Chef All Stars Los Angeles. You can check out who had to pack their knives and go last week.

In a season honoring Los Angeles, one LA legend was noticeably absent: Wolfgang Puck. Sure, snooty New Yorkers may like to make sport of disrespecting the chef to the stars who became a star himself. But he’s much more important to late 20th century American dining than his east coast critics give him credit for. In the 1980s at his hit restaurant Spago, and especially at Chinois on Main, Puck helped usher in era of fusion cuisine by merging Asian and European traditions. Perhaps some of the dismissal of Puck is simply a residual hatred of what that trend devolved into: sushi tacos at Guy Fieri’s Tex Wasabi’s.

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Hunger Is A Form Of Violence We Must Address

(Photo: YENWEI LIU / HUFFPOST)
(Photo: YENWEI LIU / HUFFPOST)

This Voices In Food story, as told to Amanda Balagur, is from the perspective of Michael W. Twitty, a food writer, culinary historian and historical interpreter. He gained international recognition through his writing, public talks and his food blog, Afroculinaria. He is also the author of The Cooking Gene, which won the 2018 James Beard Foundation Book Award for Book of the Year.

Twitty grew up in Washington D.C. and taught Hebrew school in that metro area for 15 years (he converted to Judaism at age 25). He is writing his second book, Kosher Soul, which focuses on his journey through the world of Jewish food as a Black American Jew, how Black Americans have affected Jewish food, the journey of Blacks and Jews in their own food worlds and how Black Jews have created their own foodways. He has published a

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5 of the best food processors worth investing in

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A great food processor is like having a second pair of hands in the kitchen, as they help you prep ingredients quickly.

From chopping onions to mincing meat, these versatile appliances take seconds to slice, grate and chop – most can even knead dough, too. 

They’re not the cheapest kitchen utensil but, given that we’ve all become chefs and bakers in the making during lockdown, now seems as good a time as any to invest.

Online electrical retailer, AO.com, has reported sales of food preparation appliances have risen by 510% year-on-year as Brits seek to recreate date night and ‘fakeaways’ at home – and a food processor is in the top three.

So, without

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How Food Businesses Nationwide Are Responding

These are unprecedented times. It seems like the whole world has been brought to its knees, from the rapid and destructive spread of COVID-19 to the recent protests in response to the murders of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd. The food industry isn’t exempt. So as things develop, we’ve asked people working in the food industry, from coast to coast, to share what they’re seeing in their communities, how they’ve been affected, and how they’re responding.

Wednesday, June 3rd

“With the death of George Floyd, we knew we had to do something.”

Claire King, Seward Café, Minneapolis: We haven’t been a fully operating restaurant since March 15th. We did some delivery in April with beverages, dry goods, and baked goods, but ultimately shut that down. With the death of George Floyd, we knew we had to do something. All of our personal lives were changed. No one

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